Haunted Screens: Playing with Film Terms

Be the filmmaker! Using your smartphone or iPad practice your film-vocabulary by filming different shots, camera angles and camera movements. Compare and contrast how filming an object or scene from different angles changes how you think, view, and feel. Compare and contrast how filming an object or scene from different angles changes how your audience… Read on

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Nature and the American Vision: The Course of Empire – Discussion

Host a small group discussion based on “The Course of Empire” by Thomas Cole. Cole painted this series of five paintings, The Savage State, The Arcadian or Pastoral State, The Consummation of Empire, Destruction, and Desolation, to depict his view of the rise and fall of an Empire taking place across the span of a… Read on

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Nature and the American Vision: Whose View of America?

Many of the paintings were used to capture the beauty of nature while capturing a sense of what makes America unique. After viewing the exhibition, choose one image that you would like to take for yourself and that captures the uniqueness of America to you. Consider the following prompts to assist in the discussion: Which… Read on

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Art Confrontation

Students will challenge themselves to live with a single work of art for a week that they DON’T like and see what happens. Have students find a work of art in the Museum that they definitely do not like. They should take a photo of that piece, write down its information from the label, or… Read on

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Token Response

It’s time for a game–respond to artworks instantaneously! First, print out copies of this sheet of tokens and cut out the icons. Make sure there are enough that each student has one set of tokens. At the Museum, choose a gallery with at least four artworks. Restrict your choices to FOUR works of art in… Read on

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Find a Work of Art That…

Students will think about an artwork in relation to their own life. Students receive a prompt to help them find a work of art to connect with, and then share together why that work of art spoke to them. Print out the below prompts on slips of paper: Find a work of art that has… Read on

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Say It with Art

Put yourself in another person’s shoes by “giving” a work to someone else. There are two ways to do this activity. Within your class Throw everyone’s name in a hat, from which students will draw another student’s name. Students look through the galleries for a work of art that they think the person whose name… Read on

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Object Story

Think of this as an icebreaker–the kind you did on the first day of summer camp or the first day of class to get to know each other. But instead of sharing our names and a fun fact about ourselves, introduce yourself through a work of art. At the museum, choose a boundary for your… Read on

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