Art and Inspiration with Artist Reginald Baylor

This video is part of a collection of recorded talks with Milwaukee-area professionals who don’t work in museums, but use art in their work and lives. These live talks are inspiring, combining art with many different fields. These videos are great resources for high school teachers who might want to speak with students about different… Read on

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Art Confrontation

Students will challenge themselves to live with a single work of art for a week that they DON’T like and see what happens. Have students find a work of art in the Museum that they definitely do not like. They should take a photo of that piece, write down its information from the label, or… Read on

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Token Response

It’s time for a game–respond to artworks instantaneously! First, print out copies of this sheet of tokens and cut out the icons. Make sure there are enough that each student has one set of tokens. At the Museum, choose a gallery with at least four artworks. Restrict your choices to FOUR works of art in… Read on

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Find a Work of Art That…

Students will think about an artwork in relation to their own life. Students receive a prompt to help them find a work of art to connect with, and then share together why that work of art spoke to them. Print out the below prompts on slips of paper: Find a work of art that has… Read on

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Say It with Art

Put yourself in another person’s shoes by “giving” a work to someone else. There are two ways to do this activity. Within your class Throw everyone’s name in a hat, from which students will draw another student’s name. Students look through the galleries for a work of art that they think the person whose name… Read on

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Object Story

Think of this as an icebreaker–the kind you did on the first day of summer camp or the first day of class to get to know each other. But instead of sharing our names and a fun fact about ourselves, introduce yourself through a work of art. At the museum, choose a boundary for your… Read on

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What does it Mean to Brand Yourself?

Patrick Kelly’s like the one pictured here from Inspiring Beauty, were often embellished with ribbons and buttons and, at times, included bright colors. These materials added a sense of whimsy and joy while sometimes addressing difficult issues, such as racism. Have students select objects in the exhibition that they would use to create and show… Read on

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Inspiring Beauty: Write Your Own Label

Each work of art in Inspiring Beauty has a text label; some of these include a summarized biography on the designer. The larger text panels have more extended information that relates to all the works in that section: they tell the story as to why those objects are shown together. The text panel at the… Read on

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Inspiring Beauty: What’s Your Style?

As your students will see in the Inspiring Beauty exhibition, fashion design is a form of expression—one that is influenced by the world around us and that changes over time. Remind your students that individualism and identity are reflected in the type of clothing and accessories one wears. Ask them to bring one item that… Read on

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Inspiring Beauty: What Does This Garment Say to You?

Elements of design used in the visual arts can also be found in fashion! The elements of design include: Line: A mark that may be horizontal, vertical, diagonal, or curved. Color: Solid, or combined with others, color is defined by its hue, value, and intensity. Shape and Form: The outline or arrangement of an object. Shape… Read on

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