Thomas Sully Glossary

Aesthetic: A philosophy, study, or conception of what is artistically beautiful and as such enlivens the senses. Allegory: A representation of ideas through objects or characters. Composition: The structure or organization of a work, i.e., the arrangements of shapes, areas of light and dark, spacing of subjects, etc. Oeuvre: A work of art or literature,… Read on

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What Do You Collect?

The works of art that your students will see at the Milwaukee Art Museum in Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Gainsborough: Treasures from Kenwood House, London are part of a single collection. Ask your students to define a collection. What makes something a collection? Think about how a collection might be brought together: Are the objects similar… Read on

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Exploring World Communities

Students will be introduced to art vocabulary, be able to talk about world communities as well as their own communities, locate the regions they will visit during the Museum tour, and think about how communities are connected through art. To introduce art vocabulary, have students use Tagxedo to input the key words of elements and… Read on

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We Are the Wor(l)d

In groups, have students brainstorm words that represent the vocabulary and themes they anticipate encountering on a World Communities tour at the Museum. As a whole class, share these words and compile a master list. Create a class word cloud and discuss what the most common words were and why they are meaningful to the… Read on

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What Are the Words That Bring Us Together?

Help students learn that although people may come from different cultures, their needs and desires are often very much the same. Have students experiment with the website Tagxedo, a word cloud maker. They should work together brainstorming words related to “world communities” for the upcoming trip to the Museum. Have them think of similarities and… Read on

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Répondez S’il Vous Plaît

The Impressionists were friends with many creative people in Paris in the 1800s, including writers. Charles Baudelaire was one of the most famous writers of all, and Impressionist paintings and works on paper inspired many of his writings. Here is an excerpt of his writing about Boudin’s seascapes: In the end, all these clouds, with… Read on

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Parlez-vous Français?

Look at the image gallery of pieces featured in the Impressionism show. Ask students to make a list of 5–10 places, objects, jobs, or feelings that come to mind when they look at the works. Then, use an online French-to-English dictionary to translate those words into French. Have students learn 15 words (depending on their… Read on

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Create Your Own Eye-Spy

Have students make their own “eye-spy” activity for a work of art to encourage close looking. They should use their most precise vocabulary to help the person playing the game find the objects in the work of art–or to make it trickier! Students should exchange their eye-spy with a classmate. You could also have your… Read on

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Museum Labels

Talk with your students about the labels found in a museum and how they share important information about the work of art. Let your students explore each part of a museum label on this interactive website. Then, have your students create their own labels. Use this as a research project to create historically accurate labels… Read on

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