Literature Connection

Look through picture books or read chapters from the books featured in portraits in the exhibition (e.g., Cinderella, Little Red Riding Hood, MacBeth, Merchant of Venice, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, The Old Curiosity Shop, Robinson Crusoe). Don’t forget to discuss the book and its correlation to the portraits viewed in the exhibition. Ask students… Read on

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Quotables: Respond and React

After viewing the exhibition with your students, use the quotes below by artists represented in 30 Americans as primary sources for a write-around activity. A write-around is a written discussion between four students. Divide your students into groups of four, and project one of the quotes and a work of art by the artist in… Read on

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Create a Classroom Magazine

This activity ties to social studies and news projects that you might be working on with your class, inspired by Color Rush: 75 Years of Color Photography in America. A major part of the exhibition focuses on magazines. Artists such as Nickolas Muray, Anton Bruehl, and Paul Outerbridge, Jr., used color to entice people to… Read on

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What Is Your Legacy?

Note You may want to begin with the “What Do You Collect?” pre-visit activity as an introduction to this lesson. What is a legacy? A legacy is what you leave behind—what you want to be remembered for. Lord Iveagh’s legacy was his important collection of masterpieces, given to the people of Great Britain. It was… Read on

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Place Yourself

Have your students think about the landscapes they saw in Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Gainsborough: Treasures from Kenwood House, London. You may need to remind your students that a landscape is a painting of an outdoor scene. Open up a short discussion to share some of the scenes that they remember. What was it like? What… Read on

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Talk to Me

If works of art could talk, what would they say? Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Gainsborough: Treasures from Kenwood House, London features many portraits—all, of course, with their own personality. As your students walk through the exhibition, have them choose two works of art and figure out what they would say to each other. Their works of… Read on

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Keep Your Balance: Writing Symmetrically

Explain the concept of symmetry to your students, and introduce the artist Minnie Evans. Evans was an artist who was deeply interested in symmetry: her work often centers around one human face, surrounded by plants, animals, and fantasy creatures. Her pieces were often spiritually inspired. Have your students think about symmetry in terms of language… Read on

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The Meaning of Home

Artists such as Carter Todd and James Dixon created artwork inspired by where they lived, but they combined different views of the place in one image—a bird’s-eye view of a street, for example, appears alongside a head-on view of a house. In art, this is called multiple perspectives. In this two-part activity, students will experiment… Read on

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Répondez S’il Vous Plaît

The Impressionists were friends with many creative people in Paris in the 1800s, including writers. Charles Baudelaire was one of the most famous writers of all, and Impressionist paintings and works on paper inspired many of his writings. Here is an excerpt of his writing about Boudin’s seascapes: In the end, all these clouds, with… Read on

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Create Your Own Eye-Spy

Have students make their own “eye-spy” activity for a work of art to encourage close looking. They should use their most precise vocabulary to help the person playing the game find the objects in the work of art–or to make it trickier! Students should exchange their eye-spy with a classmate. You could also have your… Read on

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